Managing Health Risks In Construction

Description

The HSE figures for 2017/2018 for ill health and occupational disease have been released and it was revealed 82,000 construction workers reported suffering work-related ill health, with around 3,000 suffering breathing and lung problems, 62% suffered musculoskeletal and 25% suffering from stress, depression or anxiety.On a positive the HSE’s figures show a plateau over the last few years.  However, the HSE are concentrating on construction sites for topical unannounced inspections.

So…are you doing enough to demonstrate safety in construction, and to prevent you or your workers being a statistic in the years to come?

To help support your training needs and to help you show management commitment to safety, Cope have produced ‘managing health risks in construction’ sessions to provide a straightforward approach in identifying and controlling hazards.  During the sessions, there will be opportunities for group discussions, sharing of successful changes to support industry members develop an alternative approach, as well as opportunity to speak one to one with our construction advisor with any individual queries.

The course covers

AM – Key Health Risks In Construction

  • Exposure to asbestos
  • Dusts including silica and lead
  • Chemicals
  • Sunlight
  • Diesel engine exhaust emissions
  • Frequent loud noise
  • Frequent or excessive use of vibrating tools
  • Frequent or excessive manual handling of loads
  • Stress and fatigue

 

PM – Management Control Measures

  • Risk management
  • Worker involvement and consultation
  • Principles of control
  • Personal protective equipment/respiratory protective equipment
  • Health surveillance
  • Record keeping

Date/Time

Date(s) - 15/05/2019
9:15 am - 4:30 pm

Location

Cope Safety Management

Map Unavailable

Bookings

(Please note that the price listed below does not include VAT)

£90.00

Details for Attendee 1

Your Details


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